The President Thursday will harness the powers of the presidency to advance executive actions on gun control, but they fall far short of his ambitious goals

(CNN) President Joe Biden on Thursday will harness the powers of the presidency to advance a half-dozen executive actions on gun control, but they fall far short of the ambitious goals he outlined as a presidential candidate as the real fight still looms on Capitol Hill.
Their limited scope once again underscores Biden's broader challenge as he faces an evenly split US Senate.
It is a policy area that has been at the top of the President's agenda for decades.
Gridlock on Capitol HillDemocratic members of Congress held strategy sessions late last month to explore the most viable steps they could take on gun control, hoping to use public outrage about those recent shootings as a catalyst for legislative progress.
Biden made his own plea to Congress not to wait "another" minute to take "common sense steps that will save lives."
1446, closing the so-called Charleston Loophole that allows some licensed gun sales to be completed before a required background check is conducted.
That legislation, which Biden advocated for as vice president, failed in 2013, and the new House-approved bills that Manchin opposes would go farther.
But with little reason for optimism about congressional action on gun control, Biden is moving ahead with actions he can take on his own.
Chipman has established strong relationships with gun safety groups and serves as an adviser to the group led by former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, one of the nation's most prominent gun control advocates, who was shot in 2011 by a gunman at an event Tuscon, Arizona.
The President plans to announce more support for community violence interventions in urban communities amid a historic spike in homicides.
But with actions on the pandemic and infrastructure taking precedence, it is so far unclear whether those items will be part of his 100-day agenda.
The executive actions that the President is laying out on Thursday may be just the first in a series of incremental steps on an issue of deep personal importance to Biden.
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